Daily Life Around Former Auschwitz Concentration Camp, Poland

A controlled burn of a crop field in the Polish town of Brzezinka, in view of the extermination camp Auschwitz II – Birkenau.

 

Editorial and Commercial Photographer Danny Ghitis is the Edge of Humanity Magazine contributor of this documentary photography.  These images are from his project ‘Land Of Os‘.  To see Danny’s portfolios and projects click on any image.

 

A farmer releases the reigns from his work horse after plowing his field in front of the Birkenau "death gate."

A farmer releases the reigns from his work horse after plowing his field in front of the Birkenau “death gate.”

 

Coal smoke billows from the former SS Headquarters at Auschwitz II - Birkenau, which is now an active Catholic Church for the village of Brzezinka . The large cross above the building is prominent in the skyline of the camp and has been protested by many Jewish organizations as an effort to "Christianize" the Holocaust.

Coal smoke billows from the former SS Headquarters at Auschwitz II – Birkenau, which is now an active Catholic Church for the village of Brzezinka . The large cross above the building is prominent in the skyline of the camp and has been protested by many Jewish organizations as an effort to “Christianize” the Holocaust.

 

A father and son from the town of Brzezinka go fishing in flooded ruins of barracks at Auschwitz II - Birkenau.

A father and son from the town of Brzezinka go fishing in flooded ruins of barracks at Auschwitz II – Birkenau.

 

A young boy at a wedding reception above the firehouse in the village of Brzezinka (Birkenau).

A young boy at a wedding reception above the firehouse in the village of Brzezinka (Birkenau).

 

A modern cemetery in the town of Oswiecim with smokestacks from the town's chemical factory looming in the distance. The factory was built by Nazi Germany during the war and used prisoners from Auschwitz to run it. After the war the new communist government expanded the industrial complex, which employed about 12,000 employees. After the fall of communism in Poland the factory became privatized and now only employs about 1,500 people.

A modern cemetery in the town of Oswiecim with smokestacks from the town’s chemical factory looming in the distance. The factory was built by Nazi Germany during the war and used prisoners from Auschwitz to run it. After the war the new communist government expanded the industrial complex, which employed about 12,000 employees. After the fall of communism in Poland the factory became privatized and now only employs about 1,500 people.

 

A tourist at Auschwitz wearing a jacket with a punk-rock reference.

A tourist at Auschwitz wearing a jacket with a punk-rock reference.

 

Women prepare for an Easter procession around an old church in the Oswiecim town square. The church is across the street from the restored Jewish Synagogue and education center

Women prepare for an Easter procession around an old church in the Oswiecim town square. The church is across the street from the restored Jewish Synagogue and education center

 

A street vendor sells balloons in Oswiecim during a Polish laborer's holiday festival.

A street vendor sells balloons in Oswiecim during a Polish laborer’s holiday festival.

 

An elderly man from Oswiecim locks his bike to a sign at Auschwitz II - Birkenau directing visitors to the Auschwitz I museum site.

An elderly man from Oswiecim locks his bike to a sign at Auschwitz II – Birkenau directing visitors to the Auschwitz I museum site.

 

See also:

Deep Valley Dark Days

Book by Danny Ghitis

 


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