Ultra-Orthodox Jews – The Traditional Way

The Circumciser ‘Mohel’

 

Photojournalist Dror Garti is the Edge of Humanity Magazine contributor of this social documentary photography.  From his project ‘Ultra-Orthodox Jews @ Work‘.  To see Dror’s  portfolio & reportage click on any image.

 

Mezuzah Reformer

Mezuzah Reformer
Mezuzahs must be checked and repaired, if possible, every 3.5 years to ensure that they are Kosher.

 

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The Wool Cutter

The Wool Cutter
The sheep wool is cut and then used to make the ‘Tzizit’ (fringes on the corners of an upper garment).

 

Many unorthodox people in Israel criticize the Ultra-Orthodox Jews for not being part of the labor market. A deeper look tells a completely different story. Visiting the various communities of the Ultra-Orthodox Jews in Israel reveals some very unique workers and craftsmen. These vary from those who have a very physical job to those who require stamina and dexterity. There are teachers and cooks, buriers and tanners, as well as Torah books writers and Tefillin makers. What unifies them all is that they practice their crafts with deep Jewish belief and great religiosity. Most of them practice their crafts in a traditional way, exactly like it was done by their fathers and grandfathers for hundreds of years, not utilizing electricity and technology to the task. The photos were taken over a 2-year period in the cities of Jerusalem, Bnei-Brak and Beit-Shemesh.

 

The Yeshiva Cook

The Yeshiva Cook
Ultra-orthodox youngsters attend the Yeshiva for long hours of Torah study. In lunchtime, they are served a hot meal cooked for them.

 

The Kugel Cook

The Kugel Cook
Kugel is a baked pie, most commonly made from egg noodles or potato. It is a traditional Ashkenazi Jewish dish, often served on Shabbat and Yom Tov.

 

The Shoykhet

The Shoykhet

The “Shoykhet” (ritual slaughterer)
Mammals and birds slaughter for food needs to be done according to Jewish dietary laws, killed “with respect and compassion”

 

The Circumciser 'Mohel'

The Circumciser (“Mohel”)
Performs the act of circumcision on a newborn baby boy 7 days after the birth.

 

Tzizit Wool Spinner

Tzizit Wool Spinner
The spinning wheel is used to convert the sheep wool into threads later used for the ‘Tzizit’ (fringes on the corners of an upper garment).

 

The Chemist

The Chemist
Some believe that medicine should be practiced like the Rambam advised, using mixtures of herbs and oils.

 

See also:

The Making Of Tefillin

By Dror Garti

 


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