The Culture Of Jewelry In India

Sterling silver brooch depicting ornamental tree that flowers in Delhi during the spring called Flame Tree or Gulmohar.

 Jewelry From Around The World #2

This photo essay depicting “The Culture of Jewelry in India” was submitted to Edge of Humanity Magazine by Pallavi Gandhi a jeweler and blogger at  “thestudioat605”

Click here to read original article.

Sterling silver brooch depicting ornamental tree that flowers in Delhi during the spring called Flame Tree or Gulmohar.

Sterling silver brooch depicting ornamental tree that flowers in Delhi during the spring called Flame Tree or Gulmohar.

Ancient Indian jewelry, whether tribal or classical, of metal or organic material, refined or primitive, was rife with symbolism and stories of the people who wore it, accounting for communal identities, marital status and social hierarchies, etc.  As it developed in isolated pockets, the jewelry in each area, spoke through distinct vernacular languages and textures.

Today, even though the jewelry looks the same, the stories have long been lost.

Pendant - Love in the city

Pendant – Love in the city

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Pendant - Love in the city

Pendant – Love in the city

Communal identities, based on caste, jobs, education and pedigree, continue to be carried forward in the urban landscape, but individuals are no longer confined by them. People, now have multiple identities, reflecting a multitude of tastes, interests and activities.

As such, jewelry finds itself in a unique space with the liberty to celebrate the mind, body and spirit of the individual, thus continuing and evolving this narrative tradition of the past.

Pendant - Sunshine in spring

Pendant – Sunshine in spring

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The brooch is inspired from a generalized concept of the mandala using the square and the circle. The corners of the square symbolize the 4 gates or directions: north, south, east and west. They lead to the inert, complete and pure circle, and thence to its core, led to by the 4 needles. The gates are made of hollow pipes symbolizing other passages prevalent, that may not lead to the desired destination.

The brooch is inspired from a generalized concept of the mandala using the square and the circle. The corners of the square symbolize the 4 gates or directions: north, south, east and west. They lead to the inert, complete and pure circle, and thence to its core, led to by the 4 needles. The gates are made of hollow pipes symbolizing other passages prevalent, that may not lead to the desired destination.

Click on the image to see original post.

The brooch, ‘Under the night sky’, shows a simplified façade of the Sis Ganj Gurudwara, in Chandni Chowk, Delhi

The brooch, ‘Under the night sky’, shows a simplified façade of the Sis Ganj Gurudwara, in Chandni Chowk, Delhi

Click on the image to see original post.

The brooch, ‘Under the night sky’, shows a simplified façade of the Sis Ganj Gurudwara, in Chandni Chowk, Delhi

The brooch, ‘Under the night sky’, shows a simplified façade of the Sis Ganj Gurudwara, in Chandni Chowk, Delhi

Click on the image to see original post.

Ring - Gathering dust.

Ring – Gathering dust.

This photo essay depicting “The Culture of Jewelry in India” was submitted to Edge of Humanity Magazine by Pallavi Gandhi a jeweler and blogger at  “thestudioat605”

Click here to read original article.

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