Bosnia – War, Children & Peace

Music therapy projects run by Warchild in Mostar, Bosnia.

 

Photographer Keith Brame is the Edge of Humanity Magazine contributor of this photo essay.  These images are from his project  ‘Bosnia and Warchild‘.  To see Keith’s portfolio and galleries click on any image.

 

Children in the war damaged streets of Mostar, Bosnia..Warchild projects in Mostar and Sarajevo, in Bosnian Wars, 1994-1995.

Children in the war damaged streets of Mostar, Bosnia.
Warchild projects in Mostar and Sarajevo, in Bosnian Wars, 1994-1995.

 

Children in the war damaged streets of Mostar, Bosnia. Warchild projects in Mostar and Sarajevo, in Bosnian Wars, 1994-1995

Children in the war damaged streets of Mostar, Bosnia.
Warchild projects in Mostar and Sarajevo, in Bosnian Wars, 1994-1995

 

“I visited Bosnia Hercegovina for the first time in March of 1995. Sarajevo, the capital was entering its third year of a siege which caused the deaths of more than 10,000 people in that city alone. 1500 children were killed there. Up to 150,000 people lost their lives in a country of less than 4 million. I was photographing educational and music projects, and worked with the charity, Warchild. All these years later I was invited back for a return trip, when I was able to travel to parts of the country that were inaccessible to me during the conflict. Whilst there, one of the most notorious actors in the war was finally arrested after years of evasion. As if in response, a thunderstorm erupted and the heavens opened.

 

Children in the war damaged streets of Mostar, Bosnia..Warchild projects in Mostar and Sarajevo, in Bosnian Wars, 1994-1995

Children in the war damaged streets of Mostar, Bosnia.
Warchild projects in Mostar and Sarajevo, in Bosnian Wars, 1994-1995

 

Music Therapy students play in the gutted National Library in Sarajevo..Warchild projects in Mostar and Sarajevo, in Bosnian Wars, 1994-1995.

Music Therapy students play in the gutted National Library in Sarajevo. Warchild projects in Mostar and Sarajevo, in Bosnian Wars, 1994-1995.

 

I visited the highland village of Lukomir on Bjelasnica Mountain near Sarajevo. At over 4000 ft, it is the highest village in the country and is perched right on the edge of a deep canyon. It survived the war, although many of the neighboring villages were destroyed, and it is completely cut off by snow for several months a year. It is a village of sheep farmers, living a lifestyle that has changed little or centuries, and provides a glimpse into an older Europe.”

 

A rain storm in the high mountain village of Lukomir on Bjelasnica Mountain does not deter the shepherds or the sheep.

A rain storm in the high mountain village of Lukomir on Bjelasnica Mountain does not deter the shepherds or the sheep.

 

A villager in traditional dress knits products for tourists and visitors to the mountain village of Lukomir (Safe Haven) on Bjelasnica Mountain.

A villager in traditional dress knits products for tourists and visitors to the mountain village of Lukomir (Safe Haven) on Bjelasnica Mountain.

 

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In the mountain village of Lukomir (meaning Safe Haven) no Bjelasnica mountain, the village imam plays with his young son.

In the mountain village of Lukomir (meaning Safe Haven) no Bjelasnica mountain, the village imam plays with his young son.

 

Chess players shelter from a rain storm in Sarajevos's old town, Bascarcija.

Chess players shelter from a rain storm in Sarajevos’s old town, Bascarcija.

 

See also:

A Return To Bosnia

By Keith Brame

 


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