Global Warming Taking Lives & Livelihoods | Forced Out Of Bangladesh’s Eroding Seashores

A stream of villagers on their way to Dhaka, in search of better living conditions.
Morrelganj, Bagerhat

 

Documentary Photographer and  Photojournalist Probal Rashid is the Edge of Humanity Magazine contributor of this documentary photography.  From his book/project ‘River Delta Crisis: Bangladesh‘.  To see Probal’s body of work click on any image.

 

A man steers his banana raft through the flood affected village.
Satkhira

 

A woman catches crabs near her home.

 

A family trapped by the flood water
Tala, Satkhira

 

A landing stage, which is threatened by erosion at the river Meghna
Bhola
August 2, 2017

 

A woman walks along a muddy street.
Gabura, Satkhira

 

When I think of my country, I think of rivers, fish and warm people.

Hundreds of rivers flow through my country giving impetuous to culture, crop and life. Rivers are etched like veins in the topographical body of my country – its splendor is incomparable. This touches me as a photographer because nature inspires both, awe and dread.

 

"These homeless Bangladeshis often end up reaching out to us city-folk for alms."

 

Every year many of my countrymen move inland as the sinking shores take with them their homes and lives. These homeless Bangladeshis often end up reaching out to us city-folk for alms. Their stories can bring tears to one’s eyes. I wanted to bring to light the plight of these people who are trying to deal with the impacts of changing weather patterns or in simple words, climate change. Although it is difficult to capture the enormity of the issue, I hope these photographs can train your gaze to the ravaging effect that rising sea levels are having on the already crowded shores of Bangladesh.

 

"The adverse effects of climate change will severely impact the economy and development of the country."

 

Bangladesh is one of the countries most vulnerable to the effects of climate change. The regular and severe natural hazards that the country already suffers from – tropical cyclones, river erosion, flood, landslides and drought – are all set to increase in intensity and frequency as a result of climate change. The adverse effects of climate change will severely impact the economy and development of the country.

 

"...estimates state that sea level rise alone will displace 18 million Bangladeshi’s within the next 40 years. The vast majority of these people will be displaced within Bangladesh – not across international borders..."

 

This project delves into one of the most dramatic impacts of climate change heralded by rising sea level, which is increasingly inundating the coastal land in Bangladesh while dramatic coastal and river erosion is destroying lands and homes. This is forcing people to move away from the coasts and social-scientists fear that this phenomenon will become prevalent throughout Bangladesh as more and more people start losing their homes, lands, property and livelihoods to the effects of climate change. While it is impossible to predict completely accurate figures of how many people will be displaced by climate change, the best current estimates state that sea level rise alone will displace 18 million Bangladeshi’s within the next 40 years. The vast majority of these people will be displaced within Bangladesh – not across international borders – presenting the Government with enormous challenges, particularly when it comes to finding places to live and work for those displaced.

 

Flood affected villagers gather to collected reliefs.

 

People gather to collect drinking water from a reverse-osmosis plant set up by a local NGO. Despite the excess of water, clean drinking water can be hard to find.

 

Md. Abdullah, 15 year old, suffers from diarrhea. Waterborne diseases like diarrhea and dysentery are becoming more and more common.
Satkhira

 

Flood affected people take shelters in the temporarily built house made of bamboo and plastic sheet.
Satkhira

 

In one of the flood affected areas a man is sleeping in the temporarily built house made of bamboo and plastic sheet.
Satkhira

 

Rani, 9 years old, collects rainwater for drinking. Rainwater is the main source of drinking water.
Village of Shyamnagar

 

See also:

 

 

Book By Probal Rashid

 

 

 

%d bloggers like this: